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Re: (meteorobs) Meteors and meteorology - some more about meteorology



Hello to all!

These words come from the Greek language and more accurate from the ancient
Greek.

METEOR and METEOROLOGY comes from the root "METEOROS" which is an adjective
in Greek. It is a compound word from "meta" + "aero".
(pronounce "meta" as you see it except for e which is pronounced as "ai"
like air, and means *through , by*.  "aero" is prounounced:  a...e...ro, but
this is not actually the case!Anyway, it means *lift*).
So, the meaning of "METEOROS" is that something happens or can be found in
the air (or atmosphere).

METEOROLOGY is the noun from "METEOROS" and means the study of "things"
(=phenomena) in the atmosphere.
METEOR is every phenomenon that occurs in the atmosphere
(thunders,rainbows,etc) including shooting stars! A wide category..

So, i believe the wrong question has been asked:
" If a meteor is an moving object in the universe, how did we chose the word
meteorology for the study of the atmosphere (and its relationship to
weather) -- it seems that the two words don't really have a relationship."

We didn't find out that meteor is an moving object in the universe and then
name it. We have created these words initially and then applied them to any
existing objects. In the beginning they didn't know that these objects come
from space so it was logical to include these "shooting stars" as
atmospheric phenomena!
Now we may have got used to call them meteors as we have already named the
other atmospheric phenomena. In a way there is the need to find a diferent
name..

In Greek, we have another specific word for meteors (except the well known
"falling stars"):
"DIATTONTES"
(pronounce it as you see it except for a like ah.. and e like "ai". I cannot
describe any further the pronunciation...We should meet to tell you!!
))))  ). Unfortunately, i haven' t found the words from which it comes
from...

So there is a strong connection between METEOR and METEOROLOGY.
In that way the meteorologists should also be interested in our "falling
stars" !!

Best wishes,
Grigoris Maravalias

e-mail: ge99010@mail.ntua.gr
web: http://users.ntua.gr/ge99010


----- Original Message -----
From: <mvallois@hotlink.com.br>
To: <meteorobs@atmob.org>
Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 2:22 PM
Subject: Re: (meteorobs) Meteors and meteorology - some more about
meteorology


>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Rob McNaught <rmn@aaocbn.aao.GOV.AU>
> To: <meteorobs@atmob.org>
> Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 1:07 AM
> Subject: Re: (meteorobs) Meteors and meteorology - some more about
> meteorology
>
>
> > On Fri, 20 Sep 2002 mvallois@hotlink.com.br wrote:
> >
> > >Meteors and meteorology, both have the same prefix. Prefix means an
> > >element that is added to the beginning of the word. What comes next
> > >is what makes the difference and the amount of the words that we have
> > >in a language. For example: METEOR and METEORology have good and
> different
> > >meanings. Meteor is an phenomenon that comes from the cosmos,
atmosphere
> > >in the general understanding; and meteorology is the study of all
> > >phenomena that comes from the atmosphere.
> >
> > I'm not sure I understand you correctly here, but what Ed said was
> correct.
> > A meteor or shooting star was previously believed to be a weather
> phenomenon
> > and a raindrop was a hydrometeor.  That meteors are now known to be
caused
> > by particles from beyond the atmosphere isn't relevant either, as the
> > particles in space are defined as *meteoroids* (in a sense, particles
> > capable of producing meteors in an atmosphere).  Thus, meteors in the
> > original or modern definitions are intricately related to the
atmosphere.
> >
> > The archive and Web site for our list is at http://www.meteorobs.org
> > To stop getting all email from the 'meteorobs' lists, use our Webform:
> > http://www.meteorobs.org/subscribe.html
>
> ___________________________________________
>
> Hello Rob and Ed:
>
> What I ntended to do was just to relate both words giving emphasis to
their
> prefixes. METEOR and METEORology = "study of the meteorological
phenomena".
> So, the meaning by itself in both words is what makes the difference. And,
> of course, there are different meanings for both words.
>
> Bill question was very convinient and appropriated for the list, I myself
> tried to take a look at the Dictionary. They are very likely. So, my
opinion
> above is NOT against yours. You were direct and technical in details.Good
> job!
>
> Although, Meteors are from particles from cosmos that are seen due - on
the
> most - to the sun light. What we see from the Earth, but now  in the
> *atmosphere* can be meteors, earthgrazers, falling stars, and other
> phenomena related to the astronomy in general. N.B.: Excuse for my fast
> typing way and mispelled English words on the note.
>
> Nice Moon, Marco Valois
> >
>
>
> The archive and Web site for our list is at http://www.meteorobs.org
> To stop getting all email from the 'meteorobs' lists, use our Webform:
> http://www.meteorobs.org/subscribe.html
>

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