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Re: (meteorobs) what does a meteorite look like?



Hi Arlene,

I will send you a few pictures of meteorites electronically in a direct mail
following this one. On the web, one of my webpages
(http://home.wanadoo.nl/marco.langbroek/meteors.html) also features a good
picture of two meteorites (a stony and an iron one) that could guide you
(and others on this list). Basically, it's all said already by Ed; meteorite
searching is not easy when your local place is strewn with terrestrial
rocks. I want to add that there are many different types and subtypes of
meteorites with different outlooks, some of which are difficult to recognize
from terrestrial rocks if you're not an expert (some look like basalts for
example, because they are basalt - but extra-terrestrial ones. E.g. the HED
group, SNC group and lunar meteorites). Weathering makes it even more
difficult - the nice black fusion crust becomes a rusty brown etcetera....
The 1969 fall in Mexico you mentioned must be the famous Allende - a rare
carbonaceous chondrite, containing organics. Will send you a picture of  a
piece of that meteorite as well!
Some explanations and characteristics and small "kitchen tests" about
meteorite recognition in a textual form can be found on our DMS website:
click on the item "meteorites" in the left hand frame of the webpage (URL:
www.dmsweb.org).

Marco Langbroek
Dutch Meteor Society
(meteorite section)

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