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Re: (meteorobs) Nov 9/10 Meteor Observations From California



There was a mysterious object in the sky after sunrise (Wednesday), see:

http://www.comet-track.com/meteor/leonids99/p1.jpg
http://www.comet-track.com/meteor/leonids99/p2.jpg
http://www.comet-track.com/meteor/leonids99/p3.jpg

Could this be a meteor train?  It made the local news.  I was up 24 hrs
ago, & saw it on TV. (they do a sunrise shot on the weather program). 
Last year's Leonids, the activity really was heavy near the horizon
3am-5am.  Here is one near morning twilight,

http://www.comet-track.com/meteor/leonids98/16mm/16mm_37.jpg

Could the above be *.jpg's be a Leonid?


A while back, there was mention of that rocket-burnup seen in Florida. 
I finally got the video scan:

http://www.comet-track.com/meteor/leonids99/p4.jpg




Robert Lunsford wrote:
> 
> My first observing session of November was held in the mountains of
> Southern California. I watched for 3 hours and faced northward to try
> to verify any Linearid activity. Out of 37 meteors seen this morning
> only 1 was a candidate for the Linearid shower. This is a stretch as
> came from an area 5 degrees east of Phecda, which is the wrong side of
> this star.
> 
> As for the Leonids, I had a couple of candidates but their velocity was
> too slow for the area of the sky in which they appeared. There was
> though, two active radiants in Cancer producing swift meteors. The
> first was near 136 (09:05) +22 which can probably be associated with
> the apex radiant. This produced 3 meteors. The second radiant, which
> produced 3, and possibly 4 meteors, was centered at 133 (08:55) +32.
> These 7 meteors were very "Leonid-like" and could have easily been
> labeled as Leonids for anyone not plotting.
> 
> The Taurids were fairly active, especially the Northern branch. The
> highlight of the session was the fact the temperatures were still mild
> when I had expected sub-freezing temperatures. The low point was being
> harassed by mosquitoes who seem to have been as numerous as the
> meteors. Don't they know it's time to head south for the winter?
> 
> November 9/10 1999
> 
> 1015-1115 UT  0.93  6.62  1 NTA   1 STA   6 SPO    8  TOTAL
> 1115-1215 UT  0.90  6.61  1 NTA   0 STA  12 SPO   13  TOTAL
> 1215-1315 UT  0.88  6.50  4 NTA   0 STA  12 SPO   16  TOTAL
> 
> TOTALS:       2.71  6.58  6 NTA   1 STA  30 SPO   37  TOTAL
> 
> The first column gives the period watched stated in Universal Time (UT)
> which is PST + 8 hours. The second column gives the percent of that
> particular hour actually spent observing the sky. Time was lost for
> plotting and data entry tonight. The third column gives the average
> limiting magnitude estimated during each period with a minimum of 4
> estimates using at least 2 and preferably 3 different sky areas close to
> my center of view. The last several columns list the activity seen
> during each period.
> 
> I was facing North at an altitude of 70 degrees during the entire
> session. No breaks were taken. NTA = Northern Taurids, STA = Southern
> Taurids, and SPO = Sporadic (random activity).
> 
> Beginning Temperature/Relative Humidity:   47 F (8 C)  36%
> Ending         "         "         "       44 F (7 C)  37%
> 
> MAGNITUDES:
> 
> NTA:    0 (1) +1 (1) +2 (1) +3 (2)+4 (1)              AVERAGE: +2.17
> STA:   +2 (1)                                         AVERAGE: +2.00
> SPO:    0 (3) +1 (4) +2 (1) +3 (8) +4 (12) +5 (1) +6 (1)
>                                                       AVERAGE: +2.97
> 
> Bob Lunsford
> San Diego, CA USA
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